Friday, November 7, 2014

Kimba, SA.

After travelling for 155 km we felt it was time to make camp for the night. Having already investigated camp sites ahead of us, Kimba Recreation Reserve seemed promising. We had crossed "The Goyder Line" and the country side changed from Salt Bush to productive cropping lands. G.W. Goyder had proposed The Goyder Line as early as 1865 and it roughly indicates areas of insufficient rainfall from those that will sustain viable agriculture.

The town of Kimba with a population of 1200 people seems to be prospering from the cropping enterprises that surround the town. Stripping of the crops was in full swing as we travelled through the area and the roads were busy with trucks delivering the grain to the silos. After setting up camp we began bucket washing the red Simpson Desert dust of the caravan, we couldn't see out of the windows there was that much dust on them. Kimba is a very friendly town and RV Travellers are made most welcome, the facilities made available, for a donation, are awesome.

We soon discovered that there was going to be a Melbourne Cup Luncheon at the local Hotel, the proceeds of the afternoon was going to support a family with a young son, Henry, who was afflicted with Cerebral Palsy. There were 55 people in attendance, 7 of those were visitors to the town. I was one of of the two males in attendance. Steve and I were out numbered so we behaved ourselves.

Our sparkling clean caravan after the bucket wash.

One of the Pavillions at The Kimba Recreation Park.

2 km out of town is a Lookout Point named White Knob. Along with a Communications Tower are these two steel statues depicting Edward John Eyre and his Aboriginal Guide. 

From atop White Knob looking back over Kimba and the vast cropping lands.

The Hotel where we had a fantastic Melbourne Cup Luncheon.

Kimba is also noted for being at the Half Way point across the continent.

There are many Galahs in the area. This one is the largest of all.

There are 20 large silos in this complex in Kimba. There is a continual line of trucks delivering grain into here.

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